1 Exercise for More Fluid Transitions

Read more at: <a href='http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Backstage-Columns/~3/VcwzAwXrToc/'>http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Backstage-Columns/~3/VcwzAwXrToc/</a> <p> - Here is some useful information :) - </p><p>I can still to this day hear my teacher Bella Itkin yelling at me across the rehearsal room from her wooden chair in her thin Russian accent, “Robert, you’re missing the ‘tranzeets!’ ” Exposing the organic process by which one thing becomes something else eluded me as a young actor. I’d learned how to read a script and break a scene into beats (so-called because of Stanislavsky’s own Russian accent pronouncing the English word “bits”), but there was something in between that was missing. It was a few years later that I had an experience playing Viola Spolin’s “Begin & End” game, which helped me better understand transitions and reveal the actor’s ability to amplify the rising action of a scene.  As we head into a new year, I’d encourage you play “Begin & End” to illuminate the “bits” of a scene, or whenever you want help with transitions. It is fun and simple.  Here’s how it works. Play a scene three times. The first time, put your focus on the scene’s basic circumstances: where, what, and who. The second time through, focus on recognizing and building each beat. Spontaneously break the scene</p><p>- Thank you for reading</p><br />

Read more at: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Backstage-Columns/~3/VcwzAwXrToc/

– Here is some useful information 🙂 –

I can still to this day hear my teacher Bella Itkin yelling at me across the rehearsal room from her wooden chair in her thin Russian accent, “Robert, you’re missing the ‘tranzeets!’ ” Exposing the organic process by which one thing becomes something else eluded me as a young actor. I’d learned how to read a script and break a scene into beats (so-called because of Stanislavsky’s own Russian accent pronouncing the English word “bits”), but there was something in between that was missing. It was a few years later that I had an experience playing Viola Spolin’s “Begin & End” game, which helped me better understand transitions and reveal the actor’s ability to amplify the rising action of a scene. 
As we head into a new year, I’d encourage you play “Begin & End” to illuminate the “bits” of a scene, or whenever you want help with transitions. It is fun and simple. 
Here’s how it works. Play a scene three times. The first time, put your focus on the scene’s basic circumstances: where, what, and who. The second time through, focus on recognizing and building each beat. Spontaneously break the scene

– Thank you for reading

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